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Recent Blog Posts

Is a Foreign Legal Consultant the Same as Pro Hac Vice Counsel?

By Robert Ross |

ADMISSION PRO HAC VICE IS DIFFERENT FROM CERTIFICATION AS A FOREIGN LEGAL CONSULTANT Pro hac vice admission grants a non-California lawyer (in good standing) permission to appear before a California court. In essence, admission pro hac vice allows a lawyer to represent clients in the same manner as a California-licensed attorney for purposes of the… Read More »

FAQ: Pro Hac Vice Admission in California

By Robert Ross |

The following are some common questions (and answers) about Pro Hac Vice Admission in California. Q: Do you have to be a lawyer to be admitted pro hac vice? A: Yes. Only attorneys who meet the qualifications are eligible for pro hac vice admission. Non-lawyers cannot be admitted to represent clients or appear pro hac… Read More »

Can California Courts Sanction Pro Hac Vice Counsel?

By Robert Ross |

CALIFORNIA COURTS HAVE AUTHORITY TO SANCTION PRO HAC VICE COUNSEL Pro hac vice admission is a process by which out-of-state attorneys (i.e., those licensed in other U.S. states, but not in California) may appear and represent clients in California courts. Attorneys who meet and comply with the requirements for pro hac vice admission can… Read More »

Rules Governing Out of State Counsel in California Arbitration Proceedings

By Robert Ross |

WHAT LAW GOVERNS OUT OF STATE COUNSEL IN CALIFORNIA ARBITRATION? Licensed California attorneys can represent clients in California courts and arbitration proceedings which take place in California. However, attorneys licensed in other jurisdictions (and not also licensed in California) do not have an automatic right to represent their clients in California proceedings–including arbitration. However,… Read More »

When Do California Courts Deny Applications For Pro Hac Vice Admission?

By Robert Ross |

This post is part of our continuing series on pro hac vice admission in California* PRO HAC VICE ADMISSION IS NOT GUARANTEED Pro hac vice admission grants a licensed out-of-state attorney permission to appear as counsel in a California court in association with a given legal matter. Generally speaking, pro hac vice admission exists as… Read More »

How Does an Attorney Apply for Pro Hac Vice Admission in California?

By Robert Ross |

WHAT IS THE PROCESS TO GAIN PRO HAC VICE ADMISSION IN CALIFORNIA? An attorney licensed in a U.S. state or territory other than California, who wishes to appear as counsel on a pro hac vice basis in a California superior court must file (a) a verified application and (b) proof of service by mail… Read More »

What is “Pro Hac Vice” Admission, and Why is it Important?

By Robert Ross |

WHAT IS PRO HAC VICE ADMISSION? The Latin phrase pro hac vice means “for this occasion only.” In the practice of law, the phrase refers to the practice of a lawyer who is not admitted to practice in a certain jurisdiction (but who is licensed in another jurisdiction) being permitted to participate as counsel in a single, specific… Read More »

Does An Appeal Stay Enforcement of A California Judgment?

By Robert Ross |

The short answer is: it can. But, as with most legal issues, the question posed in the title can’t be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” California Code of Civil Procedure (CCP) Section 916 stays enforcement of certain judgments during the pendency of an appeal. This means that, in qualifying cases, filing an appeal… Read More »

Are Property Owners Liable For Contractors’ Mistakes?

By Robert Ross |

NON-DELEGABLE DUTIES CAN CREATE LEGAL LIABILITY FOR LAND OWNERS WHEN A CONTRACTOR ACTS NEGLIGENTLY Many property owners hire contractors and assume, if anyone is injured during construction, that the contractor will bear the legal liability for the injury. However, this is not always true. California law imposes certain duties on the owner or possessor… Read More »

Res Ipsa Loquitur – Inferring Causation in Negligence Cases

By Robert Ross |

Plaintiffs Generally Must Prove All Elements Of A Case With Legally Admissible Evidence. Generally speaking, an injured plaintiff must prove all elements of his or her case in order to prevail. In negligence cases, this means proving: (1) the existence of a legally-recognized duty, (2) the defendant’s breach of that duty, (3) recoverable damages,… Read More »

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